Poetry in Motion

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November 8th, 2010
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Poetry can be a meaningful building block to literacy and critical for helping students learn to express their emotions and ideas.  Many teachers, however, find themselves stumped when it comes to tapping into student creativity.

Try using Edmodo as a platform for a running poetry slam.   Starting with a one-line prompt, ask students to each contribute a line of the poem.  (No need to assign students particular lines – just ask students to pop on to Edmodo when they are feeling inspired, or in some cases brave enough, to contribute;) Depending on the style or type of poetry you are writing, you’ll want to provide a rubric – but for the most part, leave it up to the students to determine where they take the piece.   You will be surprised at the depth of the end results..

For younger students, consider a Story Train. Use Edmodo to start one line of a story and ask each student to jump in with the next line of the story.  The only rule here is that their line has to make sense with the one that was posted prior.  When the story is complete, ask each student to illustrate their individual line (either with a drawing, or perhaps using Glogster or Pixton?) then hang the entire sequence up along the perimeter of the room, with an engine in the front and a caboose at “The End”.  For young writers, this can be an effective tool for tapping into their imagination and preparing them to write full stories on their own.

Language Arts teachers – we’ve seen a lot of chatter LA community — come share a few ideas with everyone.  How have you used Edmodo in your lessons?

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3 Responses to “Poetry in Motion”

  1. Lmims says:

    April Fool’s Day, my pen pal teacher and I, had our students collect jokes. We then had each student create a Voki, which was used to share their joke with their penpal. The kids had so much fun listening to the jokes through the Avatars!

  2. […] Poetry Slam: Tap into student creativity by starting a poetry slam or story train in Edmodo. […]

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